Automotive Tinting FAQ

Window tinting is measured by Visual Light Transparency (VLT) and is dictated to the industry by State Government Legislation.

In Victoria, Vicroads enforce a 35% VLT (the combined total of the glass and film) on all windows, excluding the Front Windscreen which should not be tinted.

Therefore, having a window tinted below a VLT of 30% will render your vehicle unroadworthy.

No, that is old technology. Back in the 1980s, it was common to see cars with windows that had taken on a purple hue due to discolouration of the tint. If you spot a car with a purple window – the tint is likely to be decades old.

Advanced technologies applied to modern film manufacture by leading suppliers is far beyond old automotive films. Developments in metal deposition methods, colour extruded base materials and specialty coatings has resulted in premium quality film products with warranted durability and longevity.

Commercial Window Tinting FAQ

Window film stands up well to Australia’s extreme weather conditions.

Firstly, the majority of films available are applied to the interior of the glass, so they are not exposed to the elements. Specialty exterior films are also available.

Secondly, manufacturers are so confident in the strength of their films they offer a minimum ten year warranty on their products, some even offering a lifetime warranty on residential applications.

No, that is old technology. Back in the 1980s, it was common to see cars with windows that had taken on a purple hue due to discolouration of the tint. If you spot a car with a purple window – the tint is likely to be decades old.

Advanced technologies applied to modern film manufacture by leading suppliers is far beyond old automotive films. Developments in metal deposition methods, colour extruded base materials and specialty coatings has resulted in premium quality film products with warranted durability and longevity.

Home & Office Tinting FAQ

The cost of window film compares very favourably with installing new windows, awnings, curtains or blinds.

Case studies show that air conditioning usage has been reduced by as much as 30% after the application of window film. This creates energy savings and less pressure on the conditioner unit.

Low-E films are available in Australia, which provide year round savings.

Window film is a cost-effective method of achieving or exceeding government mandated energy requirements set in the Building Code of Australia.

Aluminum Frames are best suited to window tinting.

The applicator will review the glass and sealant used to fix the glass to the frame. Even the most experienced applicator will need to leave a small gap between the film and the frame to ensure good adhesion.

In most cases, the applicator will trim back a small piece of the sealant to reduce the visual gap between the film and the frame.

Timber Frames must be cleaned of all paint and residue. Being a natural product, timber frames have fantastic thermal properties but are prone to “dust” around the edges of the film. Dust will not affect the performance or the life of the film.
No. Film is retrofit to existing windows, usually on the interior side of the glass. Depending on the size of the job, film can be applied within a matter of hours, with minimal disruption.

Security Film FAQ

Specially designed Security Films are used all over the world to protect people and property, such as high-profile government buildings in Australia, Britain and America.

Security Film is applied to windows, glass and doors to provide added protection in the event of break and enter, bomb blasts, explosions or extreme weather.

Security Film delays and deters intruders, as it holds broken glass in place, restricting access. In the event of an explosion, security film reduces the risk of serious injury from flying glass.

Films are available in clear or tinted, in a range of thicknesses. We are pleased to recommend the correct film for your requirements.

Environmental FAQ

Low-E films are available in Australia, which help reduce the flow of radiant heat from the warmer side of a window to the cooler side.

In winter, Low-E films reduce heat loss and in summer, they control solar heat gain, reducing both air conditioning and heating costs, so providing year round savings.

Window film is a cost-effective method of achieving or exceeding government-mandated energy requirements set in the Building Code of Australia.

No. Window film is applied using the non-hazardous mounting solution supplied by the manufacturer.
The Window Energy Rating Scheme (WERS) rates and labels window products for their annual energy impact on a whole house, in any climate in Australia.

WERS helps people accurately and confidently compare energy implications of window film. The system is independent of any one manufacturer and acts as a fair, rigorous and credible system for testing the performance claims of various products.

Star ratings for heating and cooling are given to each film. Like the energy star system used for whitegoods, the more stars the greater the efficiency of the product.

WERS conforms to the alternative solution path for energy efficiency within the Building Code of Australia and is endorsed by the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency and the Association of Building Sustainability Assessors.

The Australian Greenhouse Office helped underwrite WERS as part of its commitment to improving energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the built environment.

Andrew Booth from Spectrum Window Protection is an accredited WERS for Film installer.